• The first noticeable thing is Wilma. Wilma is a battered Lowden guitar. Lowden guitars are not easy to come by and, despite her beat-up appearance, Wilma is loved for her flaws, not in spite of them. She bears her scars proudly as a testament to the years Jon Gomm spent using her as a drum kit. It cannot have been an easy journey for Wilma but it shows the effort that Jon put in to make him one of the leaders in percussive fingerstyle guitar playing. Her new, uneven textures create unique sounds that are used creatively in songs like ‘Dance of the Last Rhino’.
  • When I saw Jon Gomm playing at Komedia in Brighton, he came onstage wearing a hooded top. It was dark and one spotlight beamed down casting a pool of shadow where the large hood was pulled well down over his head. He stood there for a few moments like some jean-wearing medieval monk and then began to play. This man is not going to be bringing out a clothing range anytime soon. This made no odds because as soon as he began to play, everything else faded into insignificance. The bare feet are still a liberty though.
  • Jon Gomm does things independently his own way. This means speaking directly to his Youtube fans, leaving long and open messages in the comments section including when his gigs are going to be. One helpful fan explained how he could put the comments in the information underneath the video. The honesty and openness of this unlikely Youtube sensation is refreshing.
  • He has an emergency disco song in the form of Chaka Khan’s ‘Ain’t Nobody’. In these troubling times, everybody needs an emergency disco song.
  • Jon Gomm is self effacing and can laugh at himself and sometimes his audiences. He stopped to demonstrate how he uses the guitar as a drum kit. He started tapping out 4 crotchets of a 4/4 beat. He said that this was the point in the gig that German audiences really felt like it was hotting up. I’m sorry German audiences, but if this video is anything to go by, the evidence is stacked against you….Die Woodys-Flichtl’s Lie